Seoul Station - Trailer
Gruesome Features Gruesome News Gruesome Trailers

Board the “Train to Busan” With the Trailer for “Seoul Station”

South Korean zombies-on-a-train flick Train to Busan (2016) was a fan favorite when it came out last year. Now, find out where those zombies came from with the animated prequel Seoul Station (2017). Train to Busan‘s director, Yeon Sang-ho, takes directorial duties in this film as well.

Let us take a look at the trailer:

It looks pretty cool. Here is the official synopsis:

A man sleeping in Seoul Station becomes a catalyst for the pandemonium in downtown Seoul; a zombie apocalypse. The rapidly spreading infection propels an authentic family drama, drawing mordant parallels to real-world social horrors.

Seoul Station - hanging
A woman hangs above a horde of zombies in Seoul Station.

The original film made it on all four of the Grue-Crew’s Top 10 lists for 2016. It looks like in Seoul Station, director Yeon Sang-Ho has captured the mixture of action, heart, and social commentary that made Train to Busan so popular. If you are excited about seeing Seoul Station, you do not have long to wait. U.S. viewers can catch in exclusively on iTunes starting May 30, 2017.

Poster for Seoul Station
Poster for Seoul Station

Paul Cardullo
Paul Cardullo is a North Carolina indy filmmaker and horror fan. His tastes range from art-house horror to low-budget schlock to indie gems to Slovenia killer hillbilly flicks. When not watching films, he helps make them. From actor to boom operator to doughnut wrangler, he makes himself useful wherever he can. Paul believes it is sometimes necessary to suffer for one’s art. He has endured being covered in [censored], having [censored] thrown at him, and spending over a year with muttonchops and a 70’s-style mustache. When not being abused for the sake of his craft, Paul works on computers and watches as many obscure (and not so obscure) movies as he can fit in.
Paul Cardullo
Paul Cardullo is a North Carolina indy filmmaker and horror fan. His tastes range from art-house horror to low-budget schlock to indie gems to Slovenia killer hillbilly flicks. When not watching films, he helps make them. From actor to boom operator to doughnut wrangler, he makes himself useful wherever he can. Paul believes it is sometimes necessary to suffer for one’s art. He has endured being covered in [censored], having [censored] thrown at him, and spending over a year with muttonchops and a 70’s-style mustache. When not being abused for the sake of his craft, Paul works on computers and watches as many obscure (and not so obscure) movies as he can fit in.