[Review] The Crazies (Groovy Gory Gruesome Gold, 1973): Romero Classic Returns with its Terrifying Trixie Trip – by Paul Cardullo

Paul Cardullo returns with another review from the incredible George A. Romero Between Night and Dawn collection. This time around the film under Paul’s microscope is the underappreciated The Crazies (1973). Taking a script called “The Mad People” (by Paul McCollough), Romero swaps out ghouls with townspeople infected by a biological weapon making them turn “crazy.” Romero’s version of the script focuses more on the military occupation of the towns under quarantine giving the film some of its iconic men-in-white-biohazard-suits visuals. Bill Hinzman, the “cemetery zombie” in Night of the Living Dead, is the film’s cinematographer. Paul admits it may not be his favorite Romero film but praises the film’s central themes and ideas. Check out Paul’s review below.

The Crazies (1973) (2.5 / 5)

Paul Cardullo

Paul Cardullo is a North Carolina indy filmmaker and horror fan. His tastes range from art-house horror to low-budget schlock to indie gems to Slovenia killer hillbilly flicks. When not watching films, he helps make them. From actor to boom operator to doughnut wrangler, he makes himself useful wherever he can. Paul believes it is sometimes necessary to suffer for one’s art. He has endured being covered in [censored], having [censored] thrown at him, and spending over a year with muttonchops and a 70’s-style mustache. When not being abused for the sake of his craft, Paul works on computers and watches as many obscure (and not so obscure) movies as he can fit in.